MTHFR, Hashimoto’s And Nutrients

Genetic Effects on Nutrient Extraction

Some individuals with Hashimoto’s may have a gene variation that prevents them from properly activating folic acid. This gene variation is present in up to 55% of the European populations, and some have been saying that this variation seems to be more common in those with hypothyroidism.

The gene involved is the MTHFR (Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase) gene, and genetic testing is available to show if someone has this gene variation. The MTHFR gene codes for the MTHFR enzyme, the enzyme that converts the amino acid homocysteine to methionine, a building block for proteins.

Individuals with low activity of the MTHFR enzyme may present with elevated homocysteine levels, which have been associated with inflammation and heart disease, birth defects, difficult pregnancies, and potentially an impaired ability to detoxify.

Nutrient deficiencies in Folate, B6, and B12 have been associated with elevated homocysteine.

Individuals with the MTHFR gene have a difficult time processing folic acid that is present in most cheap supplements and added to processed foods. Some professionals claim that this type of folic acid may even cause a build-up in the body leading to toxicity. Studies have been done that showed folic acid supplements increased cancer risk… one more reason to ditch processed foods and your multivitamin!

Folate is present in the activated form in real foods such as asparagus, spinach, and beef liver. B6 and B12 are mostly found in meats.

Betaine, (sometimes known as trimethylglycine), also helps with metabolizing homocysteine. This is known as the alternate pathway for homocysteine metabolism. Betaine can be found in whole grains like quinoa (which some individuals may not be able to eat), beets and spinach.

In addition to lifestyle changes, individuals with the MTHFR gene variation and high homocysteine levels may benefit from an activated version of folate, B6, and B12, such as methyl folate (also known as L-5-MTHF Folate), Pyridoxyl-5-Phosphate (P5P), and methylcobalamin, respectively. This is because we may not be able to get enough of the needed nutrients from food alone.

Pure Encapsulations makes a supplement called Homocysteine Factors that contains all of the above-mentioned ingredients and may be helpful for reducing homocysteine levels.
Testing for homocysteine and the MTHFR gene variation is available through many labs. 23andme.com offers a test for the MTHFR gene, and many individuals can get the tests from their physicians covered by insurance.

However, some may be concerned with this genetic information getting reported on insurance or to employers. An MTHFR variation or elevated homocysteine levels can potentially interfere with future insurance coverage that limits pre-existing conditions.

Does everyone with Hashimoto’s have this variation, and does it make Hashimoto’s worse?

Please note, not everyone with Hashimoto’s has this variation. A recent study by Arakawa and colleagues of thyroid patients with Hashimoto’s and Graves found that polymorphisms were as common in autoimmune thyroid disease as they were in the normal population.

Additionally, the authors concluded that the disease severity did not correlate with whether one had this gene variation or not.

Direct quote from the study

Genotype and allele frequencies of the MTHFR +677C/T and +1298A/C polymorphisms showed no significant differences between healthy controls and patients with AITD; these genotype and allele frequencies did not influence the prognosis of AITD.

I wish you all the best in your healing journey!

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